Integrated aquaponics – what it means for agribusiness investors in Australia

GoTafe’s William Orr Campus, Wanganui Rd, Shepparton, is offering a free presentation, ‘Integrated aquaponics – what it means for agribusiness investors in Australia‘, to take place on 4 October 2012. The illustrated talk looks at the significant investment in major projects both overseas and in Australia, future expansion and the implications for the future development of the industry.Visitors to William Orr will also have the opportunity for a guided tour of the Horticulture Dept’s new greenhouse and view some of the projects being undertaken.

Aquaponics is the coming together of two production systems: hydroponics (soilless horticulture) and aquaculture (fish production). As an industry, it has occupied the fringes of both the protected cropping and aquaculture industries. The dilemma for growers has often been in answering the question:

Am I a horticulturist growing fish or an aquaculturist growing plants?

Aquaponics is rapidly becoming a significant system for organic, fresh food supply as well as biofuel production – forging its credentials in sustainability and paving the way for further integrated production.

The presenter, Geoff Wilson, will deliver an illustrated presentation on recent global trends and developments in large scale aquaponics production systems. He will discuss:

  • the implications of aquaponics investments in Canada and United States;
  • current and future projects in Australia; and,
  • the future needs for education and training in this rapidly developing industry.

Geoff Wilson, a graduate from Dookie Agricultural College (1957), was an agribusiness journalist and communicator for 55 years. He has worked in Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, the United States and the People’s Republic of China. His specialties have been livestock industries, grains industries, horticulture, food processing, agroforestry, aquaculture, aquaponics and urban agriculture.

Geoff is passionate about aquaponics, not only as a sustainable food production system, but also as a valuable teaching tool for science disciplines such as physics, chemistry and biology; as well as related disciplines such as mathematics.

 In January 2011, Aquaponics Network Australia (ANA) was set up as a not-for-profit information service for the benefit of its financial members – mostly high school science teachers or university lecturers, plus information-hungry home growers. ANA services the Western Pacific region. Geoff Wilson is sole Director of Aquaponix Pty Ltd., the company which owns and operates ANA.

Attendees are asked to bring along their lunch and a mug. Tea and coffee will be provided.

For further information contact: Leigh Taig ltaig@gotafe.vic.edu.au or mobile 0438 381 834


3 Responses to Integrated aquaponics – what it means for agribusiness investors in Australia

  1. General Hydroponics on October 5, 2012 at 8:10 pm

    In Aquaponics fish waste serves as food for plants while plants generate oxygen for the fish to survive and breathe. With this symbiotic process you can create a healthy growing atmosphere for fishes as well as the plants!

  2. Joost van Dam on October 22, 2012 at 12:36 am

    Dear Geoff Wilson,

    We are visiting Australia and Melbourne in November 20-22 2013. would it be possible to visit you with the delegation of 11 horticultural companies from The Netherlands and hear about the new developments in Aquaponics from you?

    Kind regards,
    Joost van Dam
    Director NEC Ltd.

  3. Hydroponics Adelaide on April 30, 2013 at 6:47 pm

    There are a lot of new business that could alternate agriculture especially in this latest technology. Even though this could start at high cost, but plants can be grown anywhere, better control over plant growth and transplanting shock is reduced for seedlings. Thank you for sharing latest and unique ideas. I am very happy for reading your articles.