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Building the Dream

Tasman Bay Herbs

Tasman Bay Herbs specialise in a range of herb products.

In the face of formidable challenges, Tasman Bay Herbs today supplies 30 different varieties of culinary herbs and salad green to supermarkets across NewZealand.

From a random encounter with a book on hydroponics 13 years ago, Don Grant and his then wife, Yoka De Houwer, went from 375 square metres of glasshouse in New Zealand’s Riwaka’s Dehra Doon valley to about 5000sqm growing fresh herbs hydroponically – under the banner of Tasman Bay Herbs – for supermarkets from Auckland to Queenstown. See More

Fruit production in the future

Robotic waiters

Robots serving food in Chinese restaurant.

Where will the raw materials come from to “manufacture” our future food? ‘Fruit growing in the future’ is a paper presented by Dr Mike Nichols at the 2017 Protected Cropping Australia Conference.

It is the winter of 2100 and in a restaurant in Auckland and the waiter asks a diner about his choice of dessert.  The reply is a fresh white-fleshed nectarine, so the waiter proceeds to the kitchen and dials up the request on the food computer, which promptly instructs the 3-D printer to produce the nectarine.  See More

CREATING A HYDROPONIC CULINARY HERB GARDEN

Hherb garden

Backyard hydroponic culinary herb garden.

IN FAIR PLAY, MISSOURI USA, THE INSTITUTE OF SIMPLIFIED HYDROPONICS HAS DESIGNED AND BUILT A HYDROPONIC CULINARY HERB GARDEN AT ITS TINY HOUSE PROJECT.

By PEGGY BRADLEY

As dawn breaks, young sprigs of peppermint are selected for morning tea. At lunch, basil is selected for a pesto sauce. During the day, fresh rosemary is added to bread, and a teaspoon of tarragon is harvested for a supper dish. In the evening, sage leaves are brewed for a bedtime tea to aid in a good night’s sleep. See More

Caribbean Fresh

Emperor-Nautilus

Emperor-Nautilus

On the tiny Caribbean island of Anguilla, one luxury resort uses freshly supplied produce grown in its own pesticide-free, hydroponic farm.

By Christine Brown-Paul

A British Overseas Territory in the Eastern Caribbean, Anguilla comprises a small main island and several offshore islets. Its beaches range from long sandy stretches like Rendezvous Bay, overlooking neighbouring Saint Martin island, to secluded coves reached by boat, such as at Little Bay. Protected areas include Big Spring Cave, known for its prehistoric petroglyphs, and East End Pond, a wildlife conservation site. See More

The Final Word

Hydroponic leek

Leeks growing hydroponically.

Dr Mike Nichols looks at how huge savings in water and fertiliser might be achieved by growing hydroponically in New Zealand. 

“Water, water, every where,
Nor any drop to drink.”

Ode to the Ancient Mariner by Samuel Coleridge Taylor See More

Avoiding basic mistakes

Poor management

Photo 1: Poor management and low commitment of all parties involved led to the deterioration of infrastucture.

International hydroponics consultant Professor Gert Venter D. Eng; M. Eng (Agric) CUM LAUDE looks at some case studies, which illustrate why some greenhouse businesses in South Africa thrive while others fail. South Africa’s relatively young greenhouse industry is characterised by some spectacular successes but there are just too many projects that become total failures very soon after kick-off. See More

SULPHUR: deficiency & toxicity

Sulphur deficiency in tomato leaves

In tomatoes, chlorosis starts from the younger leaves and proceeds to the older leaves with ongoing deficiency. Leaves are uniformly light green or yellow. (Image Yara)

Plant deficiencies or excesses of mineral elements show in a number of ways: in colour, density, size and shape of leaves; in the thickness and colour of stems and the length of internodes; in the colour, fibrousness and thickness of roots; in the abundance and timing of flowers; and in the size, colour, hardness and flavour of fruit. Recognising those particular effects is the key to diagnosing nutritional disorders. 

By STEVEN CARRUTHERS See More

Let the sun shine in

Energy harvesting glass

The energy harvesting glass has been trialled as a self-sustainable bus shelter in Melbourne.

A world-first invention in clear, energy harvesting glass has been developed by western Australian scientists. It is expected that if it used in greenhouses it could produce crops in any climate or season. Greenhouses powered by nanotechnology developed in WA could turn the driest of deserts into productive agricultural land thanks to a $1.6 million grant from the Federal Government’s  Cooperative Research Centre. See More

TOWARDS 2020: GREENING OUR CITIES

Banksia 202020 Vision

Central Park greening construction

A collaborative project that is working to make Australia’s urban areas 20 per cent greener has just taken out a prestigious award for its sustainability initiatives.

By CHRISTINE BROWN-PAUL See More

Learning curve

photo3_jpg_web

At the Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment, Western Sydney University in NSW, construction is nearing completion on the new world-class Greenhouse Research Education and Training Facility.

by CHRISTINE BROWN-PAUL

Photography by Sam Ross – Additional photos courtesy Martech Plumbing See More

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